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Ft. Stevens Living History Camp


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July 8, 2017 10:00 am July 8, 2017 4:00 pm Europe/London Ft. Stevens Living History Camp

Fort Stevens was part of the extensive fortifications built around Washington, D.C., during the American Civil War. This event commemorates the history of the battle fought there in 1864 and the arrival of President Lincoln to the battleground. The fort was constructed in 1861 as “Fort Massachusetts” and later enlarged by the Union Army and renamed “Fort Stevens” after Brig. Gen. Isaac Ingalls Stevens, who was killed at the Battle of Chantilly, Virginia, on September 1, 1862. In 1861, it had a perimeter of 168 yards and places for 10 cannon. In 1862, it was expanded to 375 yards and 19 guns. It guarded the northern approach to Washington, D.C., the Seventh Street Turnpike. By 1864 Fort Stevens was one part of a thirty-seven mile-long arrangement of fortifications, consisting of sixty-eight forts intended to defend the capital.

13th St NW & Quackenbos St NW, Washington, DC 20011, USA
Ft. Stephens

Fort Stevens was part of the extensive fortifications built around Washington, D.C., during the American Civil War. This event commemorates the history of the battle fought there in 1864 and the arrival of President Lincoln to the battleground.

The fort was constructed in 1861 as “Fort Massachusetts” and later enlarged by the Union Army and renamed “Fort Stevens” after Brig. Gen. Isaac Ingalls Stevens, who was killed at the Battle of Chantilly, Virginia, on September 1, 1862. In 1861, it had a perimeter of 168 yards and places for 10 cannon. In 1862, it was expanded to 375 yards and 19 guns.

It guarded the northern approach to Washington, D.C., the Seventh Street Turnpike. By 1864 Fort Stevens was one part of a thirty-seven mile-long arrangement of fortifications, consisting of sixty-eight forts intended to defend the capital.